Rocco Penn A tech blogger, social media analyst, and general promoter of all things positive in the world. "Bring it. I'm ready." Find me on Media Caffeine, Twitter, and Facebook.

Children can’t tell the difference between an ad and a regular link

1 min read

Most people who have been using the Internet for a while can tell the difference between an advertisement and an actual search link, especially since most search engines actually highlight and identify ads, but teens aren’t that perceptive. At least, that’s what a new report from Ofcom claims, as the association recently did a study, where if found that a third of children between the age of 12 and 15 couldn’t tell the difference between an ad and a regular link, and that number was even lower for children between the age of 8 and 11. 

The familiar narrative of teens and technology is one of natural proficiency — that young people just get technology in a way that older generations don’t. But research suggests that just because children feel at home using smartphones, it doesn’t mean they’re more aware of the nuances of how the web works. In a new report published by the UK’s telecoms watchdog Ofcom, researchers found that only a third of young people aged 12 to 15 knew which search results on Google were adverts, while this figure was even lower — less than one in five — for children aged 8 to 11. “The internet allows children to learn, discover different points of view and stay connected with friends and family,” Ofcom’s director of research, James Thickett, told the Financial Times. “But these digital natives still need help to develop the knowhow they need to navigate the online world.” In the tests carried out by Ofcom earlier this year, children were shown screenshots of Google search results for the term “trainers” and asked whether the results at the top of the page were either a) ads, b) the most relevant results, or c) the most popular results. Despite the fact that these topmost search results were outlined in an orange box and labelled with the word “Ad,” they were only recognized as such by 31 percent of 12- to 15-year-olds and 16 percent of 8- to 11-year-olds.

Source
Avatar of Rocco Penn
Rocco Penn A tech blogger, social media analyst, and general promoter of all things positive in the world. "Bring it. I'm ready." Find me on Media Caffeine, Twitter, and Facebook.

Opera will soon come with a free and unlimited…

There was a time when Opera was at the forefront of web browser innovation, and some of the features that it pioneered have become...
Avatar of Lorie Wimble Lorie Wimble
1 min read

ProtonMail ditched its invite system and launched its apps

Living in a post-Snowden world, it’s hard to know which online services you can trust with your information, and that’s spawned a massive wave...
Avatar of Michio Hasai Michio Hasai
1 min read

Facebook wants to be the dictionary for the language…

Often times, it seems like conversing with people on the internet requires knowledge of a completely different form of English from what we use...
Avatar of Brian Molidor Brian Molidor
1 min read

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *